Colours

Cornish Clay (033)

As its name suggests this colour closely resembles the Cornish clays that were used to create 'green earth' pigments. A soft warm tone that would look whiter when combined with deeper or brighter shades.

Roman White (031)

A warm earth based white that gets its warmth from the addition of a touch of red ochre. This would be a good colour to use in north facing rooms where the light is always cool and bright.

Indian White (032)

A warm but very neutral white that resembled the natural unbleached calico cottons of India and which is neutral enough to work with all traditional and historic colours.

Green Earth (034)

As its name suggests, this was a much used earth pigment, based on natural clay that gave a wide variety of different neutral greens. It was also known as Terre Verte and the best pigments came from Cornwall, Verona and Germany.

Green Slate (035)

A mineral grey that has the greenish tinge associated with certain slate tones. Originally made with lamp black, which was made by burning oil, tar or resin to produce a black, smoky deposit with a slightly bluish tinge.

Quartz Grey (036)

A mid-toned warm but neutral grey that was typical of the historic 'stone' palette. These Palladian colours are based on materials such as stone, marble, alabaster, clay and granite and can be used alone or combined to great effect.

Stone Green (037)

A mid-toned warm but neutral grey that was typical of the historic 'stone' palette. These Palladian colours are based on materials such as stone, marble, alabaster, clay and granite and can be used alone or combined to great effect.

DH Drab (038)

A deep earth green thought perfect for combining with warmer and richer shades such as Salmon, Mineral Red, and Rose Madder, where it would help to intensify the glow of the warmer colours.

DH Slate (039)

This deep neutral green is yet another of the colours which had existed in slightly different variations over a couple of centuries and is very close to shades such as DH Drab. It would have been used for exterior ironwork.

Invisible Green (040)

This dark bronze green was extensively used for exterior ironwork and railings in order to render them 'invisible' and blend them with the surrounding foliage.

Pitch Black (256)

A truer, more intense black than Off-Black.

Copenhagen Blue (001)

A much used delicate and powdery blue that came from the Baltic region of Scandinavia. This colour worked well in symmetrical and classical interiors.

Light Teal (002)

A green-influenced blue; this colour had the same appearance as many of the earlier Swedish and Dutch blues. It was easy to live with, being neither overly bright nor clean.

Sky Blue (003)

A verditer shade that would have been recommended for use in south facing rooms. Blue Verditer was a cheap alternative to ultramarine but tended to become green with time.

Blue Verditer (004)

Derived from copper, this pigment produced a large number of blue shades ranging from pale and delicate to fairly deep. It has many variations each bearing separate names and was first made in the early 18th century.

Blue Ribbon (005)

All manner of blues were by this period easily and cost-effectively made. In the past the paler tints tended to turn grey or greenish very easily - this was a true powder blue.

Boathouse Blue (006)

This shade has an indigo like character but would have been made from synthetic pigments. It was thought to have a nautical quality to it which made it appropriate for rowing clubs and boathouses.

Light Cobalt (007)

Until 1802 the cobalt pigment known as Smalt was used but tended to be both very expensive and transparent. It was superseded by the synthetic pigment which, like the original, had a warm reddish tint to it.

DH Indigo (008)

Indigo was a blue dye obtained from plants that originated in India and China and was imported into Europe from the 17th century onwards. A process for making a synthetic substitute was found in about 1880.

Deep Ultramarine (009)

Ultramarine was originally made by the Italians who extracted a brilliant blue pigment from lapis lazuli. The best lapis came from Afghanistan and was expensive - the word ultramarine means 'from overseas'. The French invented an artificial substitute in.

DH Oxford Blue (010)

This intense and very deep blue is what we regard as a typical and traditional British blue. It is a shade that was considered for front doors as, along with dark greens, it worked well with Edwardian stained glass panels.

Swedish White (011)

A neutral white with soft grey undertones that works well with typical Swedish and Dutch blues. Good for use on panelling in combination with deeper shades to create a more three dimensional appearance.

Ash White (012)

A warm, neutral off-white that was typical of the Palladian style, revived in England in the 18th century. The classical style was typified by a refined classical palette and symmetry of design.

Chiltern White (013)

Another stone white reminiscent, based on local stone and earth shades. This greyed-off neutral is totally in keeping with the classical Palladian palette.

Lead White (014)

Like Lead Colour this pale grey was a typical of the neo-classical style of the late 18th century and would have looked very effective used on mouldings and cornicing.

Light French Grey (015)

A very pale grey that would look like a cool white when used with the stronger and brighter Victorian colours. Also a good colour for woodwork when used with other blues and greens.

Crystal Grey (016)

During this period great advances were being made in the creation of decorative glassware by companies such as Lalique and Baccarat. This type of colour imitated those greyed-off crystal tints that were found in glass.

Lavender Grey (017)

A delicate violet-tinted grey that is warm and subtle. It was made by mixing natural pigments to produce warm blue-greys - until the mid 19th century there was no stable violet or purple pigment.

French Grey (018)

This elegant shade was often employed in three part schemes with Yellow Ochre and Sage Green. Also good for simple but elegant bedrooms, bathrooms and dressing rooms.

Georgian Grey (019)

A typical 18th century colour that has often been found on historic paint samples. A colour that appears to be quite neutral but would become more obviously greenish in a larger area. Good for use with Warm Stone and DH Stone.

Antwerp Blue (020)

A variety of Prussian Blue, which was the first artificially created colour. It was discovered by a German between 1705 and 1710 when trying to make a red pigment and widely used as it was much cheaper than ultramarine.

Panel White (021)

A clean tinted white that, in conjunction with two toning whites, was used on panels and shutters. Flats, beading and panels were painted in three closely relating shades to create an appearance of greater three dimensional depth.

Pearl Colour (022)

A pale delicate green that was considered to be highly suitable for south facing rooms and was a let down version of the popular Pea Colour. It was often found in the drawings and interior schemes of Robert Adam.

Pale Olivine (023)

A warm but light green made from common earth pigments and which worked well with a wide range of warmer shades such as DH Salmon, Buff and Mineral Red.

Green Oxide (024)

A grey influenced green that was based on chrome oxide. A restful and subtle shade that would work well with a wide range of warmer colours such as siennas, stones and walnuts.

Green Verditer (025)

A typical Georgian green that was generically referred to as Mineral Green. Made originally from poisonous malachite copper ore until 1800 when it was replaced by artificial green pigments.

Montpelier Green (026)

This typical Art Deco ultramarine was thought to be, along with the pinks beiges and salmons, a very elegant and refined colour. It was used on all types of interior products from china and porcelain to soft furnishings.

Sage Green (027)

Similar to Sea Green but cooler in character. Thought highly suitable for drawing and sitting rooms, as well as eating rooms.

Pea Colour (028)

A term that was used to describe a wide variety of the type of Mineral Greens much used in south facing rooms and in the schemes of Robert Adam.

DH Grass Green (029)

A strong blue-influenced green that would have been used for interior panelled walls, often in conjunction with, or as a highlight to, Pea Colour.

DP Brunswick Green (030)

This is a colour that would have been much used as both an interior and exterior woodwork colour as decorative carpentry became more popular. It would also have been used on ironwork.

DH White (041)

A natural white that to our eyes is very yellowish in character. It would appear whiter if used in conjunction with one of the brighter and deeper colours.

Green Clay (042)

A neutral cream tone with a yellow-green cast that was neither warm nor cool. Based on the untinted colour of limewash, it effectively looked white when used in conjunction with some of the stronger reds.

Edwardian Lemon (043)

Primrose yellows were one of the most important colour areas in the early and mid 20th century where they were used to impart a sunny cheerfulness to domestic interiors.

Cream (044)

A standard, cost-effective and easily produced shade that was used extensively in schemes by Robert Adam. The colour is based on natural ochres.

Golden Ivory (045)

Ivory and tortoiseshell were two of the most copied materials in the Art Deco period. This type of yellow would have been thought to be a match for rich aged ivory.

Sulphur Colour (046)

Originally based on orpiment, which is sulphide of arsenic, this highly poisonous yellow was superseded in the 19th century by chrome and cadmium yellows. Cadmium yellow was shown at the Great Exhibition of 1851 and available commercially from 1846.

Pale Cream (047)

This is not a colour that we would nowadays describe as cream, being more mustard in character and more in keeping with what would have been referred to in previous centuries as Lemon Colour.

DH Straw (048)

A brighter and more intense yellow that was much used for cold north facing rooms. It was probably derived from Italian ochres and often referred to as Roman Ochre.

Deep Cream (049)

Like Pale Cream this colour appears to be misnamed, as to our eyes it is a strong clean yellow. It is typical of certain Bakelite colours that were so popular for fashionable interior accessories.

Yellow Ochre (050)

A strong earth yellow that was frequently combined with shades such as Sage Green and French Grey for a typical three part colour scheme.

DH Linen Colour (051)

A warm neutral shade made from common earth pigments that would compliment any of the stronger and brighter colours. Often referred to as Pale Stone Colour.

Pale Amber (052)

A pale apricot shade that was quite light and bright. In the 1930's a new brilliant orange called Molybdate Orange was introduced which allowed the creation of cleaner tints.

Warm Stone (053)

Another 'stone' shade so typical of the period that approximates some of the warmer limestone shades. It was created from natural ochre pigments with a little lamp black.

DH Stone (054)

A popular dark cream that is a slightly deeper version of Warm Stone. It was based on yellow ochre pigments, the best of which came from the Vaucluse area in the south of France.

Sienna Sand (055)

A true earth colour made from Italian pigments that were known as Terra de Sienna Light which would vary slightly depending on which quarry the pigment came from.

Buff (056)

This colour was similar to many of the Georgian 'stone' shades and remained popular for a long time. It was a typical early 19th century yellow derived from muted, earthy ochres.

Light Buff (057)

Another colour that seems to be a very different shade from what the name would lead one to think. This deep ochre is what would have previously been referred to as Roman Ochre.

DH Gold Colour (058)

Commonly referred to as Indian Yellow, this colour has had a long history in India where it was made by various means. Its production was prohibited in 1908.

Gold Ochre (059)

A variety of ochre that gave a warm, rich colour as opposed to some of the more acidic and lemony yellows. This colour also matched closely some shades of Italian marble used for inlay work in furniture pieces and accessories.

Spanish Brown (060)

An intense chocolate brown that was made from burnt umber that would have been used in both interior and exterior settings.

Quartz Pink (071)

A refined and elegant pink with mineral neutrality. A colour that was typical of the sophisticated pink beiges of the 1930's used in both domestic and hotel settings. A good colour for bedrooms and dressing areas.

Savoy Pink (072)

This type of colour was heavily influenced by the vogue for all things French at the beginning of the 20th century. It typified a sense of elegant living.

Ritz Rose (073)

The great London hotels of the period had a big influence on colour, décor and furniture styles. Restaurants and ballrooms were painted in flattering and feminine colours like deep rose and eau de nil.

DH Blossom (074)

This colour would have been a preferred choice in cool, north facing rooms. It represents a whole family of pinks that were referred to as Peach Blossom Colour.

Fitzrovia Red (075)

This deep raspberry red was typical of the opulent and sensuous colours used in many of the salons and drawing rooms of Bloomsbury and Fitzrovia in the early part of the 20th century.

Rose Madder (076)

A soft but clean red that was produced from the root of the plant Rubia Tinctorum, native to Greece, which was brought to France and Italy during the Crusades. It was synthesized in the mid 19th century.

Pugin Red (077)

This intense red was typical of the saturation of colour so loved by Augustus W. Pugin. His buildings and interiors such as the Palace of Westminster were inspired by the colour and craftsmanship of the Middle Ages.

Crimson (078)

This rich and intense red would have been popular in grand public buildings and galleries. Based on cadmium pigments developed in the early 19th century, this shade matched the rich reds found on damask fabrics.

Florentine Red (079)

This deep crimson red, with slight purple overtones, is typical of many of the colours used in the grand salons of Venice and Florence. Based on Italian iron oxides this shade was also much favoured for rich fabrics like damasks, brocades and velvets.

Maroon (080)

A dark and intense shade much favoured for both interior and exterior woodwork. It was also similar to many of the maroon shades favoured for both stations and coach livery by the railway companies.

Powder Colour (061)

A soft salmon beige that remained popular throughout the 1920's, 30's and 40's. This colour had the earthy quality of natural pigments.

Potters Pink (062)

This subtle pink was derived from oxides that produced a variety of shades similar in appearance to dry lime plaster. It was used by fresco painters and similar colours are found in the interior schemes of Robert Adam.

Pale Sienna (063)

An earth colour coming from Italy and known as Terra de Sienna. It produced a wide variety of warm tones ranging from soft peach to stronger terracottas. A shade favoured in the schemes of Robert Adam.

DH Salmon (064)

Like Mineral Red, this colour was extremely popular and based on red earth pigments. Commonly described as Terra de Sienna the colour was Italian in origin.

Mineral Red (065)

The very popular shades of corals and pale terracottas were based on red ochres primarily sourced in Italy. They also matched the colour of porphyry stone that was much used for columns and urns, etc.

Red Sand (066)

A deeper terracotta that became highly popular at the beginning of the 20th century due to the influence of the Arts and Crafts style. Tended to be used with shades of greens and turquoises for wallpapers and textiles.

Naples Red (067)

A typical Victorian dining room colour, this and reds like it were all based on Italian pigments and in this case, as its name suggests, from the area around Naples where is was commonly referred to as Pozzuoli Red.

DH Red (068)

A rich and intense shade, this colour would have originally been made from vermillion and red lead pigments from Spain in the Middle Ages. It was produced from cadmium pigments in the 19th century.

Red Ochre (069)

Like so many typical Victorian reds this was based on the sort of red found in the excavations at Pompeii and based on local red oxides. Much used for dining rooms and picture galleries where red was thought to be the ideal background colour.

Dark Brown (070)

The Edwardian home was influenced by many styles and this type of brown would have been used on external and internal woodwork. Half timbering looks had become popular, as had wooden porches with decorative fretwork.

Linen White (081)

A warm neutral white so named because of its resemblance to natural unbleached linen and flax. It would have been used in conjunction with a wide range of colours and other 'stone' shades.

Marble White (082)

A cool mineral based white used in older buildings. Good for classical settings and intricate mouldings where an impression of pure white is desired.

Provencal White (083)

This colour is slightly more yellow than Siena White as it is based on the ochres of Provence as opposed to the redder Italian pigments. It gives a cleaner peach or apricot tinted white.

Umber White (084)

A warm Palladian white based on the earth pigment of burnt umber. The pigment was heated or 'burnt' in order to give it a richer, redder hue. It represents the types of beige that have remained popular up to the present time.

Candle Cream (085)

This colour recreates the warm but gentle glow of candlelight. It is neither overly peach nor yellow in character but can be regarded as a very pale Warm Stone Colour.

Warm Pearl (086)

A soft, warm pink-grey that works well on its own as a neutral or in conjunction with other pink and salmon shades. Also good as a pale woodwork colour.

Pale Walnut (087)

A typical Georgian beige and a slightly paler version of much used colours such as Mid Umber and Dark Stone. Thought to be very appropriate for hallways and staircases.

Biscuit Beige (088)

This colour equates the colour of biscuit clay i.e. fired clay prior to glazing. It is a basic warm clay colour that will work with a wide range of soft earth and mineral based historic shades.

Pumice Brown (089)

A warm, fawn brown made from the natural earth pigments of raw and burnt umber. Used since Roman times it was much favoured by Palladio and became typical of a group of colours referred in the Georgian era as 'stone colour'.

Terra Ombra (090)

A mid-toned, taupe brown made from natural brown iron oxide. It was one the most used natural pigments being stable, inexpensive and widely available from a variety of European sources - the best being Italy and Cyprus. A colour much favoured for staircases, hallways and landings.

Wiltshire White (091)

A pure chalk white as found in various regions of Great Britain. The famous 'white horses' of Wiltshire cut into the chalk and made in the 18th and 19th centuries exhibit this purity of colour.

Grecian White (092)

This white typifies the idea of the pure white of ancient Greece, of classical temples and refined pieces of sculpture. This warm neutral white would look very white indeed when used in conjunction with deeper reds and terracotta shades.

Linnet White (093)

This soft and warm lime tinted white gives an informal and countrified image without looking obviously green. Good for use with ochre based creams and yellows.

Ochre White (094)

A yellow based white that exhibits the softness and warmth associated with ochre pigments. It was the type of colour used extensively for hundreds of years in the way that we would now use a modern pure white.

Green Marl (095)

Another shade based on natural green clays typical of those found near Verona in Italy, Germany and Cyprus. All these clays were used to produce a wide range of soft, neutral green pigments that had yellowish overtones.

York White (096)

Another natural shade that is based on an interpretation of a pale version of York stone. This is slightly warmer in tone than some of the more mineral based shades such as the chalk based whites.

Pale Sepia (097)

A slightly deeper and warmer version of Umber White and one that would have been widely used as a 'stone' colour. Good with stronger Georgian and Victorian shades when a warm neutral is required.

Bathstone Beige (098)

A deeper 'stone' colour than is not overly yellow in hue. This buff based colour is very versatile and would work with a very wide range of historic shades especially within some of the Adam colour schemes.

Dark Stone (099)

A good neutral mid-toned beige that works particularly well with greens and grey-greens as found in the Georgian palette. The type of colour that was frequently recommended for stairs, halls and landings.

Mid Umber (100)

A deeper 'stone' colour derived from natural earth pigments that could be used alone or with Pale Walnut to emphasise details such as doors or skirtings.

All White (2005)

Farrow & Ball's cleanest and whitest white - it will bring a freshness to every other colour.

Wevet (273)

Named after the old Dorset term for a spider’s web. A delicate fresh white which is extremely versatile.

Wimborne White (239)

Neutral/Warm. Sits between No. 2005 All White and No. 2003 Pointing®. Named after the historic Dorset town in which John Farrow & Richard Ball founded Farrow & Ball in the 1930s.

Dimpse (277)

A cool gray to complement Pavilion Gray and Blackened. The colour of twilight according to West Country dialect.

Pointing (2003)

Warm/Neutral. Named after the colour of lime pointing used in traditional brickwork.

James White (2010)

A soothing but fresh off-white with underlying green.

Clunch (2009)

Neutral. As in the chalk stone building blocks used in East Anglia. A very versatile off-white.

Great White (2006)

Neutral/Warm. A bright white but one which is neither 'yellow' nor 'cold'.

White Tie (2002)

Warm/Neutral. The white of old, pre-brightened, starched cotton.

New White (59)

Neutral. Lighter than the much used No. 3 Off-White, this colour is also slightly warmer. An ideal 'white' for use with some of the brighter colours.

House White (2012)

Warm. A light yellowed off-white.

Matchstick (2013)

Warm. Mostly used as a warm wall colour with lighter cooler woodwork and ceiling whites.

Tallow (203)

Warm. A light off-white with a yellow tint.

String (8)

A pale earth pigment based colour can be used either as an off-white with brighter colours or as its own colour with a brighter white.

Savage Ground (213)

A wallpaper ground colour favoured by Dennis Savage, a block printer par excellence.

Slipper Satin (2004)

Neutral. A very successful off-white for woodwork with strong colours or as a wall colour used with many of the other whites, both lighter and darker.

Lime White (1)

The colour of untinted brightest white limewash or soft distemper.

Off-white (3)

Neutral. This is a bright non-coloured white. Use in place of brilliant white. Paler than No. 4 Old White with which it could be used as a picking-out colour.

Cord (16)

A lively warm colour to put with natural materials.

Cream (44)

A standard for any colour card and based only on the addition of yellow ochre and in this case a little lamp black.

Cat's Paw (240)

Stronger in colour than its counterparts No. 8 String® and No. 16 Cord®, this is a good yellow-based neutral. Try alongside darker reds and warm blues.

Dimity (2008)

Warm. Most used as a wall colour in its own right with No. 2005 All White or No. 2003 Pointing on woodwork and ceiling.

Joa's White (226)

For devotees of Off-White, this colour though just darker, has none of the coolness or perceived greenish nature of Off-White.

Archive (227)

Warm. Just darker and warmer than No. 226 Joa's White, this colour would normally be seen as a buff and not an off-white unless used with strong dark colours.

Oxford Stone (264)

Darker and warmer than Archive and Joa's White. The perfect combination with London Stone for a warm interior.

London Stone (6)

Warm. John Sutcliffe's colour taken from a Nash house in Regent's Park.

Smoked Trout (60)

Neutral/Warm. A paler, less coloured version of No. 28 Dead Salmon.

Strong White (2001)

Neutral. A bright, clean white when used with dark colours. Or if used with light colours it becomes cool.

Blackened (2011)

Historically made with the addition of 'lamp black', a pigment made by collecting the residue from burnt lamp oil. Use Undercoat White.

Ammonite (274)

The colour of fossils found on the Dorset coast. A perfect contrast to the slightly darker Cornforth White.

Cornforth White (228)

Neutral/Cool. In memory of John Cornforth, architectural historian and author of the landmark publication 'English Decoration in the 18th Century' and a friend to the historic interior, who guided the working lives of so many involved in their decoration. John was foremost in the 1970's and 1980's in reviving the Georgian palette of off-whites, stones, drabs and buffs.

Purbeck Stone (275)

A stronger neutral which resembles the stone found in the Isle of Purbeck. Works perfectly with Ammonite and Cornforth White.

Pavilion Gray (242)

Cool. A lighter, less blue version of No. 88 Lamp Room Gray®, reminiscent of an elegant colour used in Sweden in the late 18th century under Gustav III. For a clean contrast use No. 2001 Strong White®.

Lamp Room Gray (88)

A match to the original white which had dirtied down due to the trimming of lamp wicks. See also No. 5 Hardwick White.

Manor House Gray (265)

A traditional 18th century colour. A definite grey which also sits happily in contemporary interiors.

Shaded White (201)

Neutral. Just darker than No. 3 Off-White and lighter than No.4 Old White. This can also be used as a light 'drab' colour.

Mizzle (266)

A soft blue grey reminiscent of a west country evening mist. The blue will become more intense when painted in a smaller room.

Hardwick White (5)

Neutral. The colourway used to touch up old white limewash at Hardwick Hall. Probably not thought of as white except in large areas or with strong dark colours. Use Undercoat No. 15.

French Gray (18)

As the name suggests, also much used in 19th century wallpapers.

Blue Gray (91)

A bluer version of French Gray. This colour will appear more blue in well lit rooms.

Pigeon (25)

Based on late 18th and 19th century paint sections.

Stony Ground (211)

A beige coloured wallpaper ground colour.

Bone (15)

As woodwork for strong colours or to simulate stone when combined with Lime White.

Fawn (10)

Warm. An often quoted colour in 18th and 19th century decorating accounts for both walls and woodwork.

Old White (4)

Neutral. This colour will look white in almost any 'old' situation.

Light Gray (17)

A stone colour, particularly successful with combined with Shaded White or Mouses Back.

Mouse's Back (40)

A quiet, neutral dark stone or drab colour. Not to be recommended for use with white but very useful as an early 18th century colour.

Skimming Stone (241)

A highly versatile off-white, 'Skimming' refers to its original use as a 19th century skim colour.

Elephant's Breath (229)

An intepretation of this famously named colour by John Fowler. Use as a colour in its own right, or as part of a 'stone' scheme.

Dove Tale (267)

Some see this colour as a grey while to others it appears to be warmer and more stony. Typical of the colours used by the Bright Young Things between the wars.

Charleston Gray (243)

Strong neutral. The Bloomsbury Group used this colour extensively, both in interior decoration and on canvas.

London Clay (244)

Strong neutral. The Bloomsbury Group used this colour extensively, both in interior decoration and on canvas.

Dead Salmon (28)

The name comes from a painting bill for the library at Kedleston of 1805, though in fact analysis suggests that the colour is far closer to No. 21 Ointment Pink. Dead Salmon as depicted here is rather more 'tired' in character than it once was.

Ringwold Ground (208)

Warm. An off-white colour similar to No. 3 Off-White but with greater warmth.

Pavilion Blue (252)

For the effect of Pale Powder when used in smaller rooms.

Pale Powder (204)

A pale, less coloured version of No. 236 Teresa's Green.

Teresas Green (236)

Just lighter in tone than the popular No. 84 Green Blue, this colour is also slightly warmer. Though originally found in the 18th century, it has been used and reused by successive generations ever since.

Green Blue (84)

This colour will at times read green, at other times blue, depending on which colours are put with it.

Light Blue (22)

Neutral. All colour cards must surely include a light blue, but it is one of the peculiarities of the colour blue to build up in intensity when painted in a room. If you wish for a slightly light blue room this, rather than the more obviously blue blues, is the one to try.

Oval Room Blue (85)

A typical late 18th, early 19th century colour which appears time and again in paint analysis. A lighter version of No. 14 Berrington Blue

Cabbage White (269)

A delightful clean colour that takes its name from the distinctive wings of the cabbage white butterfly. Slightly lighter and warmer than Borrowed Light.

Borrowed Light (235)

A perfect bedroom light blue wall colour, though it can also be used as a complement to darker colours.

Skylight (205)

A definite light blue, lighter and cleaner than No. 22 Light Blue.

Parma Gray (27)

John Fowler's name and colour sample, though surely based on 1830's and 1840's schemes.

Lulworth Blue (89)

A clean mid-tone Regency blue

St Giles Blue (280)

A clean strong blue originally found in the hall of 17th century St Giles House at Wimborne St Giles.

Cook's Blue (237)

Reminiscent of Cook's Blue as in the Farrow & Ball book 'Paint & Colour in Decoration'. Often found in kitchens and larders during the 19th century in the belief that flies never land on it.

Blue Ground (210)

A blue wallpaper ground first used in our Damask collection.

Dix Blue (82)

A cleaner, less green version of No. 84 Green Blue.

Stone Blue (86)

Indigo, as imported in the 18th century, came in lumps and was often known as 'stone blue'. This was a distemper colour.

Stiffkey Blue (281)

Reminiscent of the extraordinary colour of the mud found at Stiffkey beach, Norfolk. A slightly bluer alternative to Down Pipe.

Pitch Blue (220)

A strong definite blue made warm by the addition of magenta.

Drawing Room Blue (253)

A traditional ‘salon’ blue, this colour’s clean hue is reminiscent of the pigment Cobalt, used by artists and discerning decorators ever since its discovery in the 19th century.

Hague Blue (30)

A strong blue, reminiscent of Dutch external woodwork.

Tunsgate Green (250)

A delicate pale yellowish green, this colour can be used with a clean white to maintain its clarity or against much darker colours to act as an interesting neutral.

Green Ground (206)

One of our wallpaper ground colours based on No. 32 Cooking Apple Green.

Cooking Apple Green (32)

An old fashioned green made from common earth pigments.

Ball Green (75)

An old fashioned distemper colour from the archives.

Stone White (11)

Cool. Cooler again, but still not specifically coloured. A 'Palladian' colour.

Olive (13)

Cool. As used in early 18th century panel rooms. A true earth green.

Churlish Green (251)

This yellow-green colour has been used decoratively for centuries, both on its own and as a ground beneath patterned wallpapers. Good contrast to Tanner’s Brown No. 255.

Saxon Green (80)

An early pre-British Standard colour found on paint makers' cards.

Folly Green (76)

A late 18th century neo-classical green, somewhat paler than the fashionable No. 33 Pea Green.

Breakfast Room Green (81)

This colour is lively both by day and candlelight.

Calke Green (34)

This is a colour based directly on a cleaned version of the breakfast room at Calke Abbey.

Vert De Terre (234)

This is an excellent green, reminiscent of the pigment green earth. Darker and cooler than Cooking Apple Green, yet lighter and less stony coloured than No. 11 Stone White.

Lichen (19)

Quieter and subtler than No. 13 Olive for well lit rooms

Chappell Green (83)

This colour will at times read green, at other times blue, depending on what colours are put with it.

Castle Gray (92)

First used on the exterior woodwork of a stone castle. A good period green for exterior use.

Card Room Green (79)

For those who think this colour too drab, try with No. 10 Fawn.

Arsenic (214)

A green verdigris wallpaper ground colour first used on our Napoleonic Bee wallpaper.

Yellowcake (279)

A classic bright yellow named to reflect the revival of the ‘homemade’. Much used in kitchens during the 1960s but equally popular in 21st century homes.

Farrows Cream (67)

Farrow & Ball's original cream.

Dorset Cream (68)

A darker and more yellow version of No. 67 Farrow's Cream.

Sudbury Yellow (51)

An interpretation of John Fowler's wall colour for the staircase at Sudbury Hall, Derbyshire.

Print Room Yellow (69)

Farrow & Ball mixed this colour for an early restoration of an 18th century print room.

Lancaster Yellow (249)

This pale yellow is derived from a paint colour at Nancy Lancaster’s mid-20th century home, Kelmarsh Hall in Northamptonshire.

Dayroom Yellow (233)

So popular throughout the 1980's and 1990's, these sunny yellows actually have their origins in the England of the 1820's. A typical Soanian or Regency colour.

Citron (74)

A 19th century trade name for a strong fairly acid yellow.

Yellow Ground (218)

One of our yellow wallpaper ground colours.

Babouche (223)

The brightness of this yellow will intensify on large areas, so best trial in situ with a sample pot.

Orangery (70)

Typical 18th century terracotta colour much used in orangeries.

Pale Hound (71)

For the effect of No. 2 Hound Lemon when used in smaller rooms.

Hound Lemon (2)

Neutral/Cool. Best used in well lit spaces. This is a John Fowler colour.

Hay (37)

A bright but not excessively 'hot' yellow. An early 19th century colour.

Ciara Yellow (73)

A typical bright Irish yellow as ordered for a project in County Cork.

Straw (52)

A brighter version of John Fowler's 'straw left out in the rain' colour.

India Yellow (66)

First available in England in the 18th century this pigment was produced by reducing the bright yellow urine of cows fed on a special diet of mango leaves.

Nancy's Blushes (278)

Named after a mystery Nancy, this true pink holds real charm and is best contrasted either with All White or Black Blue.

Middleton Pink (245)

A lighter, more delicate version of No. 202 Pink Ground®.

Calamine (230)

Pinks do not always sit readily in the Farrow & Ball pallette yet colours like this one appeared regularly in country house anterooms and boudoirs from the 1870's on into Edwardian times.

Cinder Rose (246)

Cool. Contains no more than a hint of the yellow pigment found in many common pinks

Pink Ground (202)

The lightest red of our wallpaper ground colours.

Setting Plaster (231)

A definite pink in historical terms, this colour will reward those looking for a solid paint colour to reflect the colour of plaster. Try using as a wall colour with lighter, cool whites.

Fowler Pink (39)

A colour John Fowler often used for paints and wallpapers, invariably used as a glaze.

Red Earth (64)

A paler version of No. 232 Loggia.

Porphyry Pink (49)

This colour was often used on walls as a foil to porphyry details such as columns during the Regency period.

Book Room Red (50)

To do the work of either No. 42 Picture Gallery Red or No. 43 Eating Room Red but in smaller rooms.

Terre D'egypte (247)

Reds are notoriously difficult to use, often because they are seen with the wrong white. Try No. 226 Joa’s White® to complement the strength of this terracotta red.

Blazer (212)

A bright vermillion red similar to the colour of the sports blazer worn at St. John's College, Cambridge.

Incarnadine (248)

A rich crimson red, similar to the red gloss paint used by the late David Hicks at Baron’s Court in the 1970s.

Rectory Red (217)

Vermillion, as in No. 212 Blazer, red was often made cheaper by the addition of red lead which blackens with age, so changing the colour to Rectory Red.

Radicchio (96)

A cleaner, less aged version of No. 43 Eating Room Red. This is a strong red tempered by magenta.

Eating Room Red (43)

A deep red, popular around the middle of the 19th century and made possible with the discovery of new pigments. It is related to red damask colourings.

Charlotte's Locks (268)

Highly dramatic and extremely fasionable especially when combined with Railings. Widely used as an accent in the minimalist decoration of the 1950s.

Picture Gallery Red (42)

Based on the Picture Gallery at Attingham Park, but much cleaner and as a solid colour not a varnished colour.

Mole's Breath (276)

The name Mole's Breath speaks for itself – linking in with the fantastically popular Elephant's Breath but reflecting the beautiful colour of a mole’s coat.

Brinjal (222)

This deep aubergine colour originated as a 19th century estate colour.

Brassica (271)

An aged darker version of Calluna. This colour comes alive when combined with Calluna or Pelt.

Pelt (254)

Darker and less red than Brinjal, the perception of this colour will vary greatly depending on what other colours are used with it.

Plummett (272)

A lighter version of Down Pipe, imitating lead. Appropriate for interior as well as exterior use as often in Gothic architecture.

Down Pipe (26)

A colour which imitates lead on exterior ironwork and helps ‘lose’ plumbing against brickwork.

Railings (31)

A dark bronze colour, suitable for exterior ironwork in place of the usual black.

Mahogany (36)

A very useful colour used to imitate mahogany both internally and externally and in place of graining.

Tanner Brown (255)

Earth browns are the most timeless of decorative tones. Almost-black, equally suited to a loft apartment or historic house.

Studio Green (93)

The best very dark colours often appear black on colour cards and only show their colour when painted on larger areas.

Black Blue (95)

This colour is definitely blue when painted in large areas. It is a blue version of Studio Green.

Off-black (57)

More flattering to other adjacent paint colours than jet black.

Shadow White (282)

Shadow White is the lighter version of Shaded White so the two are linked and work perfectly together. Both names are taken from the soft tone created when whites are covered in a deep shade.

Drop Cloth (283)

We’ve named this colour Drop Cloth in honour of all the painters and decorators who have worked with Farrow & Ball paints for so long, as it’s the traditional name for a dust sheet. The colour has a subtle touch of mystery about it.

Cromarty (285)

The Shipping Forecast is very much part of the fabric of British life – warning all sailors about impending gales and wind. Cromarty’s name is taken from the Cromarty Firth estuary and conjures up visions of swirling mists.

Worsted (284)

Taking its name from city suiting often made from flat woven fabric, and the sleepy Norfolk village where the yarn was originally created.

Peignoir (286)

Chemise, Blazer and Babouche are all names of colours in our paint palette that have been inspired by pieces of clothing. So with that in mind, Peignoir is named after the sheer floaty garment traditionally worn by ladies while brushing their hair in the mid-20th century, perfectly summing up the romance of this hazy grey-pink.

Yeabridge Green (287)

This colour was found at Yeabridge House, an 18th century Georgian Hamstone farmhouse, when the original gun cupboard was removed. This vibrant verdant green had laid untouched for many years but was amazingly still reminiscent of the lush Somerset grass that surrounds the house.

Vardo (288)

This colour seems so full of life and joy it seemed natural to name it after something which is known to have a flamboyant colour. A Vardo is a traditional horse drawn gypsy or Romany wagon. A similar colour was used in the intricate patterning of these showmen’s vehicles (usually over red) which is seen as an important cultural high point in decoration during the mid-19th century.

Inchyra Blue (289)

This is inspired by a bespoke colour made for Lord & Lady Inchyra at beautiful classic Georgian Inchyra House in Scotland. Inchyra Blue is used on the exterior doors of their very impressive byre (or barn) which was restored in 2013. It nestles at the bottom of a rather grey and imposing brae (or hill) so needed to have a depth to it but also be sympathetic to its dramatic backdrop and work with the moody Scottish skies.

Salon Drab (290)

This name goes right back to our roots, as does the colour. Room names have always proven to be popular choice for us and the use of the word Salon not only refers to the small outer room of a drawing room but also conjures up a cultural, intellectual conversational hub. A two-part name, combining Salon, the small outer room off a drawing room, with Drab, a term favoured by true colourists, which simply describes a colour as lacking in brightness.

Loft White (222)

Shirting (129)

A pure white based on natural minerals without optical brightener- a classic heritage white

Shallows (223)

Slaked Lime (105)

A pure and neutral white made with a combination of minerals to give a warm and soft appearance

Linen Wash (33)

A broken and pared down natural linen colour,should be used in place of white in many projects

Grace (999)

A significant joinery colour from the 60s. A 1966 article in The Decorator records the outstanding trend over recent years has been the success of brilliant white or super white paints, which were launched primarily on the improved titanium dioxide.ù

First Light (49)

Soft, natural and new, this is the essence of light at dawn, ideal for walls and ceilings in many locations

Rusling (9)

A soft feminine neutral with a hint of pink-useful to add warmth to a north facing room

White Lead (74)

An aged creamy white which was named after the original house-painting pigment, lead carbonate, created when ground with raw linseed oil

Starling's Egg (97)

This, the palest of blues sets off many colours where it will be seen as white-it is always cool and fresh

Whitening (41)

Originally created by mixing chalk with water and a binder to make light reflective ceilings

Old Paper II (146)

A lighter version of the original colour, by popular request

China Clay (1)

Inspired by the raw clays of St Austel used in ceramics throughout the ages

Clockface (81)

An ever popular off-white which is often used with blues to create a timeless colour scheme

Clay Pale (152)

A new version of Regency Fawn-using more ochre-use as a warm neutral for modern and period interiors - pale version

Welcome Pale (179)

A boudoir colour of real delicacy and richness without being overbearing - pale version

Pearl Colour Pale (167)

This is a grey variant which was listed by Sir William Chambers as 'used on the beds of elaborate late 18th century ceilings' - pale version

Rolling Fog Pale (158)

Matched to an example of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses - pale version

Stock (37)

A subtle pastel shade of white from the fragrant country flower

Hollyhock (25)

A warm and pale neutral-this colour has been used extensively for many years as it is very easy on the eye

Slaked Lime Mid (149)

A pure and neutral white made with a combination of minerals to give a warm and soft appearance - mid version

Portland Stone Pale (155)

A paler version of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses

50s Magnolia (28)

From its introduction in the mid 50s this has become the iconic off-white paint colour

French Grey Pale (161)

Usually mixed with a little blue and a red, when a "middle tint" was required, this "fancy" colour was far from cheap - pale version

Gauze (106)

This lamp-black white is made in the same family as the Lead colours, but a little cooler

Echo (98)

A blue-white neutralised with umber. A beautiful bedroom or hall colour, also a good partner for darks

Welcome (109)

A boudoir colour of real delicacy and richness without being overbearing

Bone China Blue Pale (182)

A colour based on Wedgwood Jasper ware, poignantly 1930s - pale version

Joanna (130)

The palest of taupes, created for us by Joanna, a warm and easy white for many schemes

Acre (76)

A somewhat aged off-white which is a favourite in place of brilliant white in country homes

Gentle Sky (102)

A blue of cleanliness and purity which can be used with burnt orange for a very stylish look or with white for a cool celestial interior

First Light (49)

Soft, natural and new, this is the essence of light at dawn, ideal for walls and ceilings in many locations

White Lead (74)

An aged creamy white which was named after the original house-painting pigment, lead carbonate, created when ground with raw linseed oil

Ceviche (230)

Clay Pale (152)

A new version of Regency Fawn-using more ochre-use as a warm neutral for modern and period interiors - pale version

Stock (37)

A subtle pastel shade of white from the fragrant country flower

White Lead Mid (170)

An aged creamy white which was named after the original house-painting pigment, lead carbonate, created when ground with raw linseed oil - mid version

Creamerie (42)

The richest of creams-a traditional blend of ochre and umber-this same combination of pigments has been used for generations

Stock Mid (173)

A subtle pastel shade of white from the fragrant country flower - mid version

White Lead Deep (171)

An aged creamy white which was named after the original house-painting pigment, lead carbonate, created when ground with raw linseed oil - deep version

Clay Mid (153)

A new version of Regency Fawn-using more ochre-use as a warm neutral for modern and period interiors - mid version

Custard (133)

Gorgeous brighter yellow neutral - brings brightness and life to a scheme

Stock Deep (174)

A subtle pastel shade of white from the fragrant country flower - deep version

White Lead Dark (172)

An aged creamy white which was named after the original house-painting pigment, lead carbonate, created when ground with raw linseed oil - dark version

Pitcairn (61)

This soft tint of ochre and umber provides a perfect backdrop for pictures in a sitting room or gallery

Ivory (62)

Often used in a gloss finish and put with eau de nil for a classic 1930s colour scheme

Gauze Deep (165)

This lamp-black white is made in the same family as the Lead colours, but a little cooler - deep version

Woodbine (134)

Honeysuckle. This green shade neutral brings garden colour indoors without being overpowering

Stock Dark (175)

A subtle pastel shade of white from the fragrant country flower - dark version

Aged Ivory (131)

Beautiful toned down version of a middle yellow - can be considered a stone colour

Chamois (132)

Warm and vibrant neutral used often with stone and natural textiles

Ceviche (230)

Chimney Brick (247)

Chocolate Colour (124)

It is believed that Frederick Handel and Benjamin Franklin had their London front doors painted in this rich, almost edible shade

Cool Arbour (232)

Dark Lead Colour (118)

A very durable colour used mainly on ironwork and gates during this period

Dash of Soot (244)

Dolphin (246)

Down (242)

Fescue (231)

Flint (236)

French Grey (113)

Usually mixed with a little blue and a red, when a "middle tint" was required, this "fancy" colour was far from cheap

French Grey Dark (163)

Usually mixed with a little blue and a red, when a "middle tint" was required, this "fancy" colour was far from cheap - dark version

French Grey Mid (162)

Usually mixed with a little blue and a red, when a "middle tint" was required, this "fancy" colour was far from cheap - mid version

French Grey Pale (161)

Usually mixed with a little blue and a red, when a "middle tint" was required, this "fancy" colour was far from cheap - pale version

Furrow (241)

Gauze (106)

This lamp-black white is made in the same family as the Lead colours, but a little cooler

Gauze Dark (166)

This lamp-black white is made in the same family as the Lead colours, but a little cooler - dark version

Gauze Deep (165)

This lamp-black white is made in the same family as the Lead colours, but a little cooler - deep version

Gauze Mid (164)

This lamp-black white is made in the same family as the Lead colours, but a little cooler - mid version

Grey Moss (234)

Grey Teal (226)

Inox (224)

Knightsbridge (215)

Lamp Black (228)

Lead Colour (117)

Another "common" Georgian colour which once graced the London residence of composer George Frederick Handel

Limestone (238)

Loft White (222)

Mid Lead Colour (114)

The darker lead colour provides a more powerful finish and was favoured on woodwork and doors

Mirage II (4)

Delicate mauve, which marries the tones of pink and blue

Mono (218)

An extremely versatile shade either as a neutral amongst stronger colours or an elegant blue when seen against a soft off-white.

Mortar (239)

Perennial Grey (245)

Portland Stone (77)

Matched to an example of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses

Portland Stone Dark (157)

Matched to an example of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses - dark version

Portland Stone Deep (156)

Matched to an example of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses - deep version

Portland Stone Pale (155)

A paler version of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses

Rolling Fog (143)

Matched to an example of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses

Rolling Fog Dark (160)

Matched to an example of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses - dark version

Rolling Fog Mid (159)

Matched to an example of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses - mid version

Rolling Fog Pale (158)

Matched to an example of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses - pale version

Rubine Ashes (243)

Scree (227)

Serpentine (233)

Shallows (223)

Slaked Lime Deep (150)

A pure and neutral white made with a combination of minerals to give a warm and soft appearance - deep version

Slaked Lime Mid (149)

A pure and neutral white made with a combination of minerals to give a warm and soft appearance - mid version

Toad (235)

True Taupe (240)

Tusk (237)

Urbane Grey (225)

Welcome (109)

A boudoir colour of real delicacy and richness without being overbearing

Welcome Dark (181)

A boudoir colour of real delicacy and richness without being overbearing - dark version

Welcome Deep (180)

A boudoir colour of real delicacy and richness without being overbearing - deep version

Wood Ash (229)

Old Paper II (146)

A lighter version of the original colour, by popular request

Down (242)

50s Magnolia (28)

From its introduction in the mid 50s this has become the iconic off-white paint colour

China Clay Mid (176)

Inspired by the raw clays of St Austel used in ceramics throughout the ages - mid version

Ceviche (230)

Clay Mid (153)

A new version of Regency Fawn-using more ochre-use as a warm neutral for modern and period interiors - mid version

Rolling Fog Mid (159)

Matched to an example of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses - mid version

Joanna (130)

The palest of taupes, created for us by Joanna, a warm and easy white for many schemes

Stone-Pale-Warm (34)

A subtle pastel shade of white from the fragrant country flower - pale warm version

Stone-Pale-Cool (65)

A subtle pastel shade of white from the fragrant country flower - pale cool version

Clay Deep (154)

A new version of Regency Fawn-using more ochre-use as a warm neutral for modern and period interiors - deep version

Ivory (62)

Often used in a gloss finish and put with eau de nil for a classic 1930s colour scheme

Hammock (38)

An unbleached calico-replacing white in many country houses of England

Beauvais Lilac (29)

An enigmatic shade which was originally based on a number of colours found on the tapestries at the royal factory in Beauvais, Picardy

Stone-Mid-Cool (66)

A subtle pastel shade of white from the fragrant country flower - mid cool version

Aged Ivory (131)

Beautiful toned down version of a middle yellow - can be considered a stone colour

Clay (39)

A new version of Regency Fawn-using more ochre-use as a warm neutral for modern and period interiors

China Clay Dark (178)

Inspired by the raw clays of St Austel used in ceramics throughout the ages - darker version

Regency Fawn (30)

A rather precious colour as it often contained a dash of the red pigment vermilion

Stone-Mid-Warm (35)

A subtle pastel shade of white from the fragrant country flower - mid warm version

Portland Stone Deep (156)

Matched to an example of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses - deep version

Mushroom (142)

The classic gentle interior colour - neutral with a hint of red oxide for warmth

Portland Stone Dark (157)

Matched to an example of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses - dark version

Rolling Fog (143)

Matched to an example of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses

Stone-Dark-Cool (67)

A subtle pastel shade of white from the fragrant country flower - dark cool version

Bath Stone (64)

Matched to an example or original Bath Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses

Rolling Fog Dark (160)

Matched to an example of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses - dark version

Roman Plaster (31)

A darker version of Regency Fawn (No.30)

Stone-Dark-Warm (36)

A subtle pastel shade of white from the fragrant country flower - dark warm version

Silt (40)

A deep warm clay with exceptional texture and character

Echo (98)

A blue-white neutralised with umber. A beautiful bedroom or hall colour, also a good partner for darks

Gauze (106)

This lamp-black white is made in the same family as the Lead colours, but a little cooler

Gauze Mid (164)

This lamp-black white is made in the same family as the Lead colours, but a little cooler - mid version

Drizzle (217)

A classic grey-blue, this shade will become stronger when painted on a larger area and on several walls.

Bone China Blue Mid (183)

A colour based on Wedgwood Jasper ware, poignantly 1930s - mid version

Gauze Deep (165)

This lamp-black white is made in the same family as the Lead colours, but a little cooler - deep version

Pearl Colour (100)

This is a grey variant which was listed by Sir William Chambers as 'used on the beds of elaborate late 18th century ceilings'

Gauze Dark (166)

This lamp-black white is made in the same family as the Lead colours, but a little cooler - dark version

Gentle Sky (102)

A blue of cleanliness and purity which can be used with burnt orange for a very stylish look or with white for a cool celestial interior

Salix (99)

This cool silver can be used with dark and vibrant colours for a particularly sophisticated scheme

Bone China Blue Deep (184)

A colour based on Wedgwood Jasper ware, poignantly 1930s - deep version

Brighton (84)

An extremely versatile, very clean blue-green shade. Its obvious seaside connotation was embraced by home decorators across the land to create fresh, calm, spacious interiors

Aquamarine (138)

Classic blend of blue green using umber to create a subtlety which brings a gentle coolness and tranquility to a room

Celestial Blue (101)

A dusky variant of Sky Blue found on a rare surviving paint colour card of 1807

Sky Blue (103)

Made with Prussian blue to bring the summer sky indoors. Originally available in oil paint and distemper,it was first used in the dining room of Moy House

Bone China Blue (107)

A colour based on Wedgwood Jasper ware, poignantly 1930s

Turquoise Blue (93)

Reminiscent of the bluish greens found on Persian pottery, popular china and in jewellery of the 1930s this colour is classic sophistication

Blue Verditer (104)

An especially English blue which was frequently used in distemper and on wallpapertraces have been uncovered in the revered Kenwood House, London

James (108)

A pretty powder blue alternate, warmer than many blues by the inclusion of white and violet

Tivoli (206)

A variation on Tropez Blue and, being cleaner, was a successful foil to darker true blues.

Juniper Ash (115)

A gorgeous blue, with warmth and intimacy,without being overwhelming by its presence

Canton (94)

Inspired by Chinese rugs, ceramics and textiles from the Canton area this colour would adorn south facing rooms with off-white and a pale blue-green

Mambo (112)

A signature shade from Little Greene. Wake up and dance!

Weekend (110)

A gentle purple-grey which commands subtle attention in any living space

Marine Blue (95)

In a west-facing room it was recommended that this colour be used in combination with a pale grey and a coral red

Deep Space Blue (207)

As with Lawnmower Green, this shade achieved its greatest provenance some time after its introduction, becoming a mainstay in Laura Ashleys cottage style, and also featured in Terence Conrans New House Book of the 1980s.

Hicks' Blue (208)

David Hicks, one of the most important designers of the 60s and 70s, used powerful colours in combination to dramatic effect. Besides domestic projects for English aristocracy, Hicks also worked on many commercial projects and used this blue in the restaurant at the top of the London Telecom Tower in 1962.

Thai Sapphire (116)

A saturated and hot blue-adds splendour and drama to a scheme

Basalt (221)

For a distinctive front door, look no further than this timeless blue-black.

Polar Blue (121)

Featuring in classic 50s interiors alongside curtains of terracotta and white with upholstery in lime yellow and rose

Starling's Egg (97)

This, the palest of blues sets off many colours where it will be seen as white-it is always cool and fresh

Pearl Colour Pale (100)

This is a grey variant which was listed by Sir William Chambers as 'used on the beds of elaborate late 18th century ceilings' - pale version

Linnet (89)

A favourite colour as this shade combines umber and synthetic yellow giving light and vibrancy

Pearl Colour Mid (168)

This is a grey variant which was listed by Sir William Chambers as 'used on the beds of elaborate late 18th century ceilings' - mid version

Mirror (219)

A pared-down green with an unquestionable calming quality.

Drizzle (217)

A classic grey-blue, this shade will become stronger when painted on a larger area and on several walls.

Acorn (87)

Fresh and bright pale green, ideal for use in kitchens and conservatories, can also add light to dark interiors

Lemon Tree (69)

A pale and more neutral version of Pale Lime (No.70)

Olive Oil (83)

A beautiful, classic green for use as a highlight with Cricket White (No.82)

Cupboard Green (201)

A pale avocado colour, very typical of the period as a pared down, pastel shade that evoked the spirit of the new clean, bold colours but without dominating a room.

Salix (99)

This cool silver can be used with dark and vibrant colours for a particularly sophisticated scheme

Tracery II (78)

This lighter version of Normandy Grey (No.79) is a very sophisticated colour favoured by architects it can be used with great style to off-set limestone, marble and granite

Kitchen Green (85)

A popular colour that hints at the orchard and eases the transition from the inside to the garden

Eau-de-Nil (90)

If a colour could sum up an era this would be pure 1930s. Understated and enduring elegance

Pearl Colour Dark (169)

This is a grey variant which was listed by Sir William Chambers as 'used on the beds of elaborate late 18th century ceilings' - dark version

Apple (137)

A superb tertiary ground colour upon which a myriad of soft furnishings are enhanced

Normandy Grey (79)

A timeless grey stone with undisputed elegance and personality

Aquamarine (138)

Classic blend of blue green using umber to create a subtlety which brings a gentle coolness and tranquility to a room

Oak Apple (63)

The wet wood colour-a deep verdant cream, subtle and calm

Phthalo Green (199)

Taking its name from the dye pigment, this electric green was extolled in the March 1971 edition of Ideal Home by the interior designer David Mlinaric, who championed strong multi-coloured schemes and suggested the use of this green with ochre shades.

Pea Green (91)

A soft peaceful colour which was recommended for dining rooms where the rest of the house was painted in stone colour

Pale Lime (70)

A gentle colour which would have been teamed with a darker blue green and a grey

Green Verditer (92)

A by-product of the silver refining process this copper carbonate based pigment was first used in the Book Room of Broughton House

Spearmint (202)

The interior of one of Mervyn Seal's Butterfly Houses was described in 1961 as full of eastern spaciousness. This shade, along with Brighton were both contributors to this iconic example of 1960s English architecture.

Aquamarine - Deep (198)

As Horizon, Aquamarine Deep is a shade that was used with pale and mid browns, both for contrasting walls and in furniture and accessories.

Turquoise Blue (93)

Reminiscent of the bluish greens found on Persian pottery, popular china and in jewellery of the 1930s this colour is classic sophistication

Boxington (84)

A reduced lime with added red-oxide of iron provides a relaxing and elegant backdrop in dining rooms and studios

Garden (86)

A gentle & reduced colour of Light Brunswick Green-extra white has been added to create a colour which is midsummer itself

Citrine (71)

In a North-facing room it was recommended that this be used with a pale greeny-yellow and a chocolate brown colour

Sage Green (80)

This was one of the colours enjoyed by the Victorians "on account of their repose to the sight, and their solid and quiet tone"

Canton (94)

Inspired by Chinese rugs, ceramics and textiles from the Canton area this colour would adorn south facing rooms with off-white and a pale blue-green

Olive Oil (72)

A beautiful, classic green for use as a highlight with Cricket White (No.82)

Olive Colour (72)

This was a fashionable colour despite its price tag. Mrs Delany, the 18th century writer, records having her English room "painted a sort of olive for the sake of my pictures"

Invisible Green (56)

Made popular by the landscape gardener Humphry Repton who recommended it for fencing and railings so that they would blend better with the background vegetation

Obsidian Green (216)

A classic off-black colour, Obsidian Green has since been a popular colour for front doors and exterior railings, but in the 1970s it provided a dramatic backdrop to natural wood furnishings and khaki.

First Light (49)

Soft, natural and new, this is the essence of light at dawn, ideal for walls and ceilings in many locations

White Lead Mid (170)

An aged creamy white which was named after the original house-painting pigment, lead carbonate, created when ground with raw linseed oil - mid version

Linnet (89)

A favourite colour as this shade combines umber and synthetic yellow giving light and vibrancy

Creamerie (42)

The richest of creams-a traditional blend of ochre and umber-this same combination of pigments has been used for generations

Stock Mid (173)

A subtle pastel shade of white from the fragrant country flower - mid version

White Lead Deep (171)

An aged creamy white which was named after the original house-painting pigment, lead carbonate, created when ground with raw linseed oil - deep version

Lemon Mivvi (993)

This colour, brought with migrants from the West Indies in the early to mid 1960s, was sometimes used as an external colour, and on internal walls, balanced by plain green linoleum floorsù.

Custard (133)

Gorgeous brighter yellow neutral - brings brightness and life to a scheme

Stock Deep (174)

A subtle pastel shade of white from the fragrant country flower - deep version

White Lead Dark (172)

An aged creamy white which was named after the original house-painting pigment, lead carbonate, created when ground with raw linseed oil - dark version

Ivory (62)

Often used in a gloss finish and put with eau de nil for a classic 1930s colour scheme

Lemon Tree (69)

A pale and more neutral version of Pale Lime (No.70)

Woodbine (134)

Honeysuckle. This green shade neutral brings garden colour indoors without being overpowering

Stock Dark (175)

A subtle pastel shade of white from the fragrant country flower - dark version

Carys (148)

A classic Regency colour - bright and excellent with grey

Apple (137)

A superb tertiary ground colour upon which a myriad of soft furnishings are enhanced

Trumpet (196)

An accent colour, derived from the development of strong coloured plastics. Popular when used sparingly in more neutral environments and sometimes used as a joinery colour for flush door faces and architraves

Sunlight (135)

A true reduction of ochre and titanium brightened with a dash of organic yellow

Oak Apple (63)

The wet wood colour-a deep verdant cream, subtle and calm

Pale Lime (70)

A gentle colour which would have been teamed with a darker blue green and a grey

Yellow-Pink (46)

Pink' was once used in connection with a yellow obtained from the Woad plant. A rich earthy colour which was also used to dye wallpaper

Citrine (71)

In a North-facing room it was recommended that this be used with a pale greeny-yellow and a chocolate brown colour

Mister David (47)

Our brightest yellow, has been used to capture the sun in French country kitchens

Julies Dream (26)

A light pinky shade based on umber which gives warmth without being too sweet

Chemise (139)

This subdued and delicate pink - brings warmth and intimacy to a room

Pink Slip (220)

Based on red oxide, the name is a nod to both the petticoat colour and warm clay.

Whisper (5)

A more bold and cleaner shade of Mirage II: can be used well in contemporary bathrooms

Dorchester Pink (213)

A 1960s article on an interior in the Dorchester Hotel describes the use of this colour

Angie (185)

A delightful pale pink shade, and cited as a shade to be ?embraced with a palette of mid-browns.?

Light Peachblossom (3)

A rather exclusive colour once used in the Royal Pavilion, Brighton and in the dining room of the Regency Town House

Debutant (995)

A mid shade of lilac, which, during the 70s, was introduced as a colour for living areas as well as the bedroom.

Milk Thistle (187)

A stronger lilac colour, favoured by David Hicks (see 208 Hicks Blue), in conjunction with a brilliant white ceiling and ivory woodwork.

Terra di Sienna (994)

An historic earthy colour uncovered on one of the earliest surviving paint cards from 1807

Carmine (189)

A colour introduced by migrants from the Indian subcontinent. A colour card of 1968 includes Carmine as a dusky pink ? one of the new-this-year emulsion coloursù.

Orange Aurora (21)

A popular accent colour used with Magnolia on the walls and pinky beige on the doors

Leather (191)

The brightest of pinks, this signature 1970s colour was used in conjunction with Marigold and Purpleheart in the most arresting colour schemes of the time.

Ashes of Roses (6)

A soft brownish red acheived by mixing the primary red with the secondary green and favoured for its depth and discretion

Tuscan Red (140)

Chalky and intense deep terracotta red; found naturally as a complex oxide of iron,this pigment has been used over the centuries to colour paints and cosmetics

Atomic Red (190)

Another of the powerful, primary shades that made its way to the English decorative paint market as a direct result of the immigration swell in the 1970s.

Heat (24)

A strong and contemporary burnt orange, can be used well as an accent in many schemes

Mischief (13)

An exciting and glamorous shade mixing magenta and violet to an intoxicating effect

Adventurer (7)

A regal and reassuring plum aubergine-suitable for creation of atmosphere and intimacy

Callaghan (214)

This rich red-brown colour was one of the more muted shades of the period. Like Cork, it was inspired by new exotic holiday destinations and was used to replicate the look of imported hardwood.

Drummond (16)

A lighter version of Baked Cherry tempered with more red-oxide of iron

Mambo (112)

A signature shade from Little Greene. Wake up and dance!

Baked Cherry (14)

A sumptuous red, wonderfully rich and hugely popular for dining rooms and studies

Bronze Red (15)

A name more commonly used to describe the bronze lustre of printing inks, but taken from a late 19th century book of paint colours

Theatre Red (192)

A sophisticated burgundy shade from the late 1970s which saw continued popularity into the next decade alongside Deep Space Blue and Vincent.

Purpleheart (188)

The classic 1970s purple. Used in all rooms, even specified by 1970s architects Pini and Zerbi for several entrance hall ceilings!

Purple Brown (8)

A moody lightfast colour used extensively outdoors and on window sashes

Rolling Fog Dark (160)

Matched to an example of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses - dark version

Roman Plaster (31)

A darker version of Regency Fawn (No.30)

Stone-Dark-Warm (36)

A subtle pastel shade of white from the fragrant country flower - dark warm version

Silt (40)

A deep warm clay with exceptional texture and character

Middle-Buff (998)

This darker buff made its name on the first British Standard range of paint colours and can be found on many 1930s buildings

Callaghan (214)

This rich red-brown colour was one of the more muted shades of the period. Like Cork, it was inspired by new exotic holiday destinations and was used to replicate the look of imported hardwood.

Mocha (997)

Use this colour with Marigold, Tan, brilliant white woodwork (and a shagpile carpet) for an authentic retro-chic interior!

Light Bronze Green (123)

One of the many variants of a colour designed to resemble bronze in its patinated form

Attic II (144)

A darker and more complex version of Silt (40), arresting schemes are made using colours from this group

Felt (145)

Deep warm and charming brown colour, can be used on large surfaces to great effect

Spanish Brown (32)

A type of naturally-occurring dark red ochre pigment which was specified for external work

Purple Brown (8)

A moody lightfast colour used extensively outdoors and on window sashes

Chocolate Colour (124)

It is believed that Frederick Handel and Benjamin Franklin had their London front doors painted in this rich, almost edible shade

Olive Colour (72)

This was a fashionable colour despite its price tag. Mrs Delany, the 18th century writer, records having her English room "painted a sort of olive for the sake of my pictures"

Callaghan (214)

This rich red-brown colour was one of the more muted shades of the period. Like Cork, it was inspired by new exotic holiday destinations and was used to replicate the look of imported hardwood.

Hicks' Blue (208)

David Hicks, one of the most important designers of the 60s and 70s, used powerful colours in combination to dramatic effect. Besides domestic projects for English aristocracy, Hicks also worked on many commercial projects and used this blue in the restaurant at the top of the London Telecom Tower in 1962.

Aquamarine - Deep (198)

As Horizon, Aquamarine Deep is a shade that was used with pale and mid browns, both for contrasting walls and in furniture and accessories.

Mono (218)

An extremely versatile shade either as a neutral amongst stronger colours or an elegant blue when seen against a soft off-white.

Mirror (219)

A pared-down green with an unquestionable calming quality.

Slaked Lime Deep (150)

Slaked Lime Deep

Slaked Lime Dark (151)

Slaked Lime Dark

Portland Stone (77)

Matched to an example of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses

Portland Stone Deep (156)

Matched to an example of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses - deep version

Portland Stone Dark (157)

Matched to an example of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses - dark version

Mushroom (142)

The classic gentle interior colour - neutral with a hint of red oxide for warmth

French Grey Mid (162)

Usually mixed with a little blue and a red, when a "middle tint" was required, this "fancy" colour was far from cheap - mid version

French Grey (113)

Usually mixed with a little blue and a red, when a "middle tint" was required, this "fancy" colour was far from cheap

French Grey Dark (163)

Usually mixed with a little blue and a red, when a "middle tint" was required, this "fancy" colour was far from cheap - dark version

Lead Colour (117)

Another "common" Georgian colour which once graced the London residence of composer George Frederick Handel

Rolling Fog (143)

Matched to an example of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses

Rolling Fog Dark (160)

Matched to an example of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses - dark version

Silt (40)

A deep warm clay with exceptional texture and character

Stone-Dark-Cool (67)

A subtle pastel shade of white from the fragrant country flower - dark cool version

Light Peachblossom (3)

A rather exclusive colour once used in the Royal Pavilion, Brighton and in the dining room of the Regency Town House

Tuscan Red (140)

Chalky and intense deep terracotta red; found naturally as a complex oxide of iron,this pigment has been used over the centuries to colour paints and cosmetics

Ashes of Roses (6)

A soft brownish red acheived by mixing the primary red with the secondary green and favoured for its depth and discretion

Chamois (132)

Warm and vibrant neutral used often with stone and natural textiles

Woodbine (134)

Honeysuckle. This green shade neutral brings garden colour indoors without being overpowering

Sunlight (135)

A true reduction of ochre and titanium brightened with a dash of organic yellow

Oak Apple (63)

The wet wood colour-a deep verdant cream, subtle and calm

Apple (137)

A superb tertiary ground colour upon which a myriad of soft furnishings are enhanced

Gauze Deep (165)

This lamp-black white is made in the same family as the Lead colours, but a little cooler - deep version

Gauze Dark (166)

This lamp-black white is made in the same family as the Lead colours, but a little cooler - dark version

Salix (99)

This cool silver can be used with dark and vibrant colours for a particularly sophisticated scheme

Aquamarine (138)

Classic blend of blue green using umber to create a subtlety which brings a gentle coolness and tranquility to a room

Pearl Colour (100)

This is a grey variant which was listed by Sir William Chambers as 'used on the beds of elaborate late 18th century ceilings'

Pearl Colour Dark (169)

This is a grey variant which was listed by Sir William Chambers as 'used on the beds of elaborate late 18th century ceilings' - dark version

Tracery II (78)

This lighter version of Normandy Grey (No.79) is a very sophisticated colour favoured by architects it can be used with great style to off-set limestone, marble and granite

Normandy Grey (79)

A timeless grey stone with undisputed elegance and personality

Sage Green (80)

This was one of the colours enjoyed by the Victorians "on account of their repose to the sight, and their solid and quiet tone"

Celestial Blue (101)

A dusky variant of Sky Blue found on a rare surviving paint colour card of 1807

Bone China Blue Deep (184)

A colour based on Wedgwood Jasper ware, poignantly 1930s - deep version

Bone China Blue (107)

A colour based on Wedgwood Jasper ware, poignantly 1930s

Juniper Ash (115)

A gorgeous blue, with warmth and intimacy,without being overwhelming by its presence

Invisible Green (56)

Made popular by the landscape gardener Humphry Repton who recommended it for fencing and railings so that they would blend better with the background vegetation

Lead Colour (117)

Another "common" Georgian colour which once graced the London residence of composer George Frederick Handel

Stone-Mid-Cool (35)

A subtle pastel shade of white from the fragrant country flower - mid cool version

Stone-Dark-Cool (67)

A subtle pastel shade of white from the fragrant country flower - dark cool version

Stone-Dark-Warm (36)

A subtle pastel shade of white from the fragrant country flower - dark warm version

Cream Colour (55)

Known in the 18th and 19th centuries as a 'common' colour to denote its everyday suitability, its warmth has ensured its enduring popularity

Straw Colour (44)

A classic Regency colour - bright and excellent with grey

White Lead (74)

An aged creamy white which was named after the original house-painting pigment, lead carbonate, created when ground with raw linseed oil

Whitening (41)

Originally created by mixing chalk with water and a binder to make light reflective ceilings

Stone-Pale-Cool (65)

A subtle pastel shade of white from the fragrant country flower - pale cool version

Stone-Pale-Warm (34)

A subtle pastel shade of white from the fragrant country flower - pale warm version

Lead White (57)

The creamy colour that results from grinding lead carbonate with boiled linseed oil. Perfectly suited to the exterior of original sash windows

Olive Colour (72)

This was a fashionable colour despite its price tag. Mrs Delany, the 18th century writer, records having her English room "painted a sort of olive for the sake of my pictures"

Pearl Colour (100)

This is a grey variant which was listed by Sir William Chambers as 'used on the beds of elaborate late 18th century ceilings'

Sky Blue (103)

Made with Prussian blue to bring the summer sky indoors. Originally available in oil paint and distemper,it was first used in the dining room of Moy House

Spanish Brown (32)

A type of naturally-occurring dark red ochre pigment which was specified for external work

Invisible Green (56)

Made popular by the landscape gardener Humphry Repton who recommended it for fencing and railings so that they would blend better with the background vegetation

Chocolate Colour (124)

It is believed that Frederick Handel and Benjamin Franklin had their London front doors painted in this rich, almost edible shade

Light Bronze Green (123)

One of the many variants of a colour designed to resemble bronze in its patinated form

Portland Stone (77)

Matched to an example of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses

French Grey (113)

Usually mixed with a little blue and a red, when a "middle tint" was required, this "fancy" colour was far from cheap

Bath Stone (64)

Matched to an example or original Bath Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses

Ashes of Roses (6)

A soft brownish red acheived by mixing the primary red with the secondary green and favoured for its depth and discretion

Bronze Red (15)

A name more commonly used to describe the bronze lustre of printing inks, but taken from a late 19th century book of paint colours

Light Gold (53)

A delightful warm colour originally conceived from chrome yellow, white and a dash of vermilion

Mid Bronze Green (125)

A verdant colour used to paint Victorian front doors and railings throughout the 19th century

Sage Green (80)

This was one of the colours enjoyed by the Victorians "on account of their repose to the sight, and their solid and quiet tone"

Purple Brown (8)

A moody lightfast colour used extensively outdoors and on window sashes

Loft White (222)

Shallows (223)

Inox (224)

Urbane Grey (225)

Grey Teal (226)

Scree (227)

Lamp Black (228)

Wood Ash (229)

Ceviche (230)

Fescue (231)

Cool Arbour (232)

Serpentine (233)

Grey Moss (234)

Toad (235)

Flint (236)

Tusk (237)

Limestone (238)

Mortar (239)

True Taupe (240)

Furrow (241)

Chocolate Colour (124)

It is believed that Frederick Handel and Benjamin Franklin had their London front doors painted in this rich, almost edible shade

Down (242)

Rubine Ashes (243)

Dash of Soot (244)

Perennial Grey (245)

Dolphin (246)

Knightsbridge (215)

Chimney Brick (247)

French Grey Pale (161)

Usually mixed with a little blue and a red, when a "middle tint" was required, this "fancy" colour was far from cheap - pale version

French Grey Mid (162)

Usually mixed with a little blue and a red, when a "middle tint" was required, this "fancy" colour was far from cheap - mid version

French Grey (113)

Usually mixed with a little blue and a red, when a "middle tint" was required, this "fancy" colour was far from cheap

French Grey Dark (163)

Usually mixed with a little blue and a red, when a "middle tint" was required, this "fancy" colour was far from cheap - dark version

Slaked Lime (105)

A pure and neutral white made with a combination of minerals to give a warm and soft appearance

Slaked Lime Mid (149)

A pure and neutral white made with a combination of minerals to give a warm and soft appearance - mid version

Slaked Lime Deep (150)

A pure and neutral white made with a combination of minerals to give a warm and soft appearance - deep version

Slaked Lime Dark (151)

A pure and neutral white made with a combination of minerals to give a warm and soft appearance - dark version

Portland Stone Pale (155)

A paler version of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses

Portland Stone (77)

Matched to an example of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses

Portland Stone Deep (156)

Matched to an example of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses - deep version

Portland Stone Dark (157)

Matched to an example of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses - dark version

Clay Pale (152)

A new version of Regency Fawn-using more ochre-use as a warm neutral for modern and period interiors - pale version

Clay Mid (153)

A new version of Regency Fawn-using more ochre-use as a warm neutral for modern and period interiors - mid version

Clay Deep (154)

A new version of Regency Fawn-using more ochre-use as a warm neutral for modern and period interiors - deep version

Stock (37)

A subtle pastel shade of white from the fragrant country flower

Stock Mid (173)

A subtle pastel shade of white from the fragrant country flower - mid version

Stock Deep (174)

A subtle pastel shade of white from the fragrant country flower - deep version

Stock Dark (175)

A subtle pastel shade of white from the fragrant country flower - dark version

White Lead (74)

An aged creamy white which was named after the original house-painting pigment, lead carbonate, created when ground with raw linseed oil

White Lead Mid (170)

An aged creamy white which was named after the original house-painting pigment, lead carbonate, created when ground with raw linseed oil - mid version

White Lead Deep (171)

An aged creamy white which was named after the original house-painting pigment, lead carbonate, created when ground with raw linseed oil - deep version

White Lead Dark (172)

An aged creamy white which was named after the original house-painting pigment, lead carbonate, created when ground with raw linseed oil - dark version

Pearl Colour Pale (167)

This is a grey variant which was listed by Sir William Chambers as 'used on the beds of elaborate late 18th century ceilings' - pale version

Pearl Colour Mid (168)

This is a grey variant which was listed by Sir William Chambers as 'used on the beds of elaborate late 18th century ceilings' - mid version

Pearl Colour (100)

This is a grey variant which was listed by Sir William Chambers as 'used on the beds of elaborate late 18th century ceilings'

Pearl Colour Dark (169)

This is a grey variant which was listed by Sir William Chambers as 'used on the beds of elaborate late 18th century ceilings' - dark version

Bone China Blue Pale (182)

A colour based on Wedgwood Jasper ware, poignantly 1930s - pale version

Bone China Blue Mid (183)

A colour based on Wedgwood Jasper ware, poignantly 1930s - mid version

Bone China Blue Deep (184)

A colour based on Wedgwood Jasper ware, poignantly 1930s - deep version

Bone China Blue (107)

A colour based on Wedgwood Jasper ware, poignantly 1930s

Gauze (106)

This lamp-black white is made in the same family as the Lead colours, but a little cooler

Gauze Mid (164)

This lamp-black white is made in the same family as the Lead colours, but a little cooler - mid version

Gauze Deep (165)

This lamp-black white is made in the same family as the Lead colours, but a little cooler - deep version

Gauze Dark (166)

This lamp-black white is made in the same family as the Lead colours, but a little cooler - dark version

Welcome Pale (179)

A boudoir colour of real delicacy and richness without being overbearing - pale version

Welcome (109)

A boudoir colour of real delicacy and richness without being overbearing

Welcome Deep (180)

A boudoir colour of real delicacy and richness without being overbearing - deep version

Welcome Dark (181)

A boudoir colour of real delicacy and richness without being overbearing - dark version

China Clay (1)

Inspired by the raw clays of St Austel used in ceramics throughout the ages

China Clay Mid (176)

Inspired by the raw clays of St Austel used in ceramics throughout the ages - mid version

China Clay Deep (177)

Inspired by the raw clays of St Austel used in ceramics throughout the ages - deep version

China Clay Dark (178)

Inspired by the raw clays of St Austel used in ceramics throughout the ages - darker version

Rolling Fog Pale (158)

Matched to an example of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses - pale version

Rolling Fog Mid (159)

Matched to an example of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses - mid version

Rolling Fog (143)

Matched to an example of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses

Rolling Fog Dark (160)

Matched to an example of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses - dark version

First Light (49)

Soft, natural and new, this is the essence of light at dawn, ideal for walls and ceilings in many locations

Rusling (9)

A soft feminine neutral with a hint of pink-useful to add warmth to a north facing room

White Lead (74)

An aged creamy white which was named after the original house-painting pigment, lead carbonate, created when ground with raw linseed oil

Old Paper II (146)

A lighter version of the original colour, by popular request

Clay Pale (152)

A new version of Regency Fawn-using more ochre-use as a warm neutral for modern and period interiors - pale version

Stock (37)

A subtle pastel shade of white from the fragrant country flower

Hollyhock (25)

A warm and pale neutral-this colour has been used extensively for many years as it is very easy on the eye

Slaked Lime Mid (149)

A pure and neutral white made with a combination of minerals to give a warm and soft appearance - mid version

White Lead Mid (170)

An aged creamy white which was named after the original house-painting pigment, lead carbonate, created when ground with raw linseed oil - mid version

Creamerie (42)

The richest of creams-a traditional blend of ochre and umber-this same combination of pigments has been used for generations

50s Magnolia (28)

From its introduction in the mid 50s this has become the iconic off-white paint colour

French Grey Pale (161)

Usually mixed with a little blue and a red, when a "middle tint" was required, this "fancy" colour was far from cheap - pale version

Stock Mid (173)

A subtle pastel shade of white from the fragrant country flower - mid version

White Lead Deep (171)

An aged creamy white which was named after the original house-painting pigment, lead carbonate, created when ground with raw linseed oil - deep version

China Clay Mid (176)

Inspired by the raw clays of St Austel used in ceramics throughout the ages - mid version

Welcome (109)

A boudoir colour of real delicacy and richness without being overbearing

Clay Mid (153)

A new version of Regency Fawn-using more ochre-use as a warm neutral for modern and period interiors - mid version

Rolling Fog Mid (159)

Matched to an example of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses - mid version

Gauze Mid (164)

This lamp-black white is made in the same family as the Lead colours, but a little cooler - mid version

Stock Deep (174)

A subtle pastel shade of white from the fragrant country flower - deep version

Custard (133)

Gorgeous brighter yellow neutral - brings brightness and life to a scheme

Joanna (130)

The palest of taupes, created for us by Joanna, a warm and easy white for many schemes

Stone-Pale-Warm (34)

A subtle pastel shade of white from the fragrant country flower - pale warm version

Acre (76)

A somewhat aged off-white which is a favourite in place of brilliant white in country homes

White Lead Dark (172)

An aged creamy white which was named after the original house-painting pigment, lead carbonate, created when ground with raw linseed oil - dark version

China Clay Deep (177)

Inspired by the raw clays of St Austel used in ceramics throughout the ages - deep version

Pitcairn (61)

This soft tint of ochre and umber provides a perfect backdrop for pictures in a sitting room or gallery

Stone-Pale-Cool (65)

A subtle pastel shade of white from the fragrant country flower - pale cool version

French Grey Mid (162)

Usually mixed with a little blue and a red, when a "middle tint" was required, this "fancy" colour was far from cheap - mid version

Ivory (62)

Often used in a gloss finish and put with eau de nil for a classic 1930s colour scheme

Gauze Deep (165)

This lamp-black white is made in the same family as the Lead colours, but a little cooler - deep version

Clay Deep (154)

A new version of Regency Fawn-using more ochre-use as a warm neutral for modern and period interiors - deep version

Slaked Lime Deep (150)

A pure and neutral white made with a combination of minerals to give a warm and soft appearance - deep version

Mirage II (4)

Delicate mauve, which marries the tones of pink and blue

Woodbine (134)

Honeysuckle. This green shade neutral brings garden colour indoors without being overpowering

Beauvais Lilac (29)

An enigmatic shade which was originally based on a number of colours found on the tapestries at the royal factory in Beauvais, Picardy

Pearl Colour (100)

This is a grey variant which was listed by Sir William Chambers as 'used on the beds of elaborate late 18th century ceilings'

Hammock (38)

An unbleached calico-replacing white in many country houses of England

Mono (218)

An extremely versatile shade either as a neutral amongst stronger colours or an elegant blue when seen against a soft off-white.

Portland Stone (77)

Matched to an example of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses

Welcome Deep (180)

A boudoir colour of real delicacy and richness without being overbearing - deep version

Stock Dark (175)

A subtle pastel shade of white from the fragrant country flower - dark version

Stone Mid Cool (66)

A subtle pastel shade of white from the fragrant country flower - mid cool version

Aged Ivory (131)

Beautiful toned down version of a middle yellow - can be considered a stone colour

China Clay Dark (178)

Inspired by the raw clays of St Austel used in ceramics throughout the ages - darker version

Gauze Dark (166)

This lamp-black white is made in the same family as the Lead colours, but a little cooler - dark version

Clay (39)

A new version of Regency Fawn-using more ochre-use as a warm neutral for modern and period interiors

Chamois (132)

Warm and vibrant neutral used often with stone and natural textiles

French Grey (113)

Usually mixed with a little blue and a red, when a "middle tint" was required, this "fancy" colour was far from cheap

Portland Stone Deep (156)

Matched to an example of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses - deep version

Slaked Lime Dark (151)

A pure and neutral white made with a combination of minerals to give a warm and soft appearance - dark version

Stone-Mid-Warm (35)

A subtle pastel shade of white from the fragrant country flower - mid warm version

Mushroom (142)

The classic gentle interior colour - neutral with a hint of red oxide for warmth

Welcome Dark (181)

A boudoir colour of real delicacy and richness without being overbearing - dark version

Portland Stone Dark (157)

Matched to an example of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses - dark version

Tracery II (78)

This lighter version of Normandy Grey (No.79) is a very sophisticated colour favoured by architects it can be used with great style to off-set limestone, marble and granite

Stone-Dark-Cool (67)

A subtle pastel shade of white from the fragrant country flower - dark cool version

Rolling Fog (143)

Matched to an example of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses

Bath Stone (64)

Matched to an example or original Bath Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses

French Grey Dark (163)

Usually mixed with a little blue and a red, when a "middle tint" was required, this "fancy" colour was far from cheap - dark version

Roman Plaster (31)

A darker version of Regency Fawn (No.30)

Rolling Fog Dark (160)

Matched to an example of original Portland Stone and used to paint the facades of Victorian town houses - dark version

Lead Colour (117)

Another "common" Georgian colour which once graced the London residence of composer George Frederick Handel

Mid Lead Colour (114)

The darker lead colour provides a more powerful finish and was favoured on woodwork and doors

Stone Dark Warm (36)

A subtle pastel shade of white from the fragrant country flower - dark warm version

Silt (40)

A deep warm clay with exceptional texture and character

Middle-Buff (998)

This darker buff made its name on the first British Standard range of paint colours and can be found on many 1930s buildings

Callaghan (214)

This rich red-brown colour was one of the more muted shades of the period. Like Cork, it was inspired by new exotic holiday destinations and was used to replicate the look of imported hardwood.

Light Bronze Green (123)

One of the many variants of a colour designed to resemble bronze in its patinated form

Dark Lead Colour (118)

A very durable colour used mainly on ironwork and gates during this period

Mocha (997)

Use this colour with Marigold, Tan, brilliant white woodwork (and a shagpile carpet) for an authentic retro-chic interior!

Attic II (144)

A darker and more complex version of Silt (40), arresting schemes are made using colours from this group

Felt (145)

Deep warm and charming brown colour, can be used on large surfaces to great effect

Spanish Brown (32)

A type of naturally-occurring dark red ochre pigment which was specified for external work

Chocolate Colour (124)

It is believed that Frederick Handel and Benjamin Franklin had their London front doors painted in this rich, almost edible shade

Purple Brown (8)

A moody lightfast colour used extensively outdoors and on window sashes

Tuscan Red (140)

Chalky and intense deep terracotta red; found naturally as a complex oxide of iron,this pigment has been used over the centuries to colour paints and cosmetics

Atomic Red (190)

Another of the powerful, primary shades that made its way to the English decorative paint market as a direct result of the immigration swell in the 1970s.

Heat (24)

A strong and contemporary burnt orange, can be used well as an accent in many schemes

Adventurer (7)

A regal and reassuring plum aubergine-suitable for creation of atmosphere and intimacy

Callaghan (214)

This rich red-brown colour was one of the more muted shades of the period. Like Cork, it was inspired by new exotic holiday destinations and was used to replicate the look of imported hardwood.

Mischief (13)

An exciting and glamorous shade mixing magenta and violet to an intoxicating effect

Drummond (16)

A lighter version of Baked Cherry tempered with more red-oxide of iron

Juniper Ash (115)

A gorgeous blue, with warmth and intimacy,without being overwhelming by its presence

Mister David (47)

Our brightest yellow, has been used to capture the sun in French country kitchens

Dark Lead Colour (118)

A very durable colour used mainly on ironwork and gates during this period

Light Bronze Green (123)

One of the many variants of a colour designed to resemble bronze in its patinated form

Olive Colour (72)

This was a fashionable colour despite its price tag. Mrs Delany, the 18th century writer, records having her English room "painted a sort of olive for the sake of my pictures"

Baked Cherry (14)

A sumptuous red, wonderfully rich and hugely popular for dining rooms and studies

Mambo (112)

A signature shade from Little Greene. Wake up and dance!

Theatre Red (192)

A sophisticated burgundy shade from the late 1970s which saw continued popularity into the next decade alongside Deep Space Blue and Vincent.

Attic II (144)

A darker and more complex version of Silt (40), arresting schemes are made using colours from this group

Marine Blue (95)

In a west-facing room it was recommended that this colour be used in combination with a pale grey and a coral red

Bronze Red (15)

A name more commonly used to describe the bronze lustre of printing inks, but taken from a late 19th century book of paint colours

Deep Space Blue (207)

As with Lawnmower Green, this shade achieved its greatest provenance some time after its introduction, becoming a mainstay in Laura Ashleys cottage style, and also featured in Terence Conrans New House Book of the 1980s.

Hicks' Blue (208)

David Hicks, one of the most important designers of the 60s and 70s, used powerful colours in combination to dramatic effect. Besides domestic projects for English aristocracy, Hicks also worked on many commercial projects and used this blue in the restaurant at the top of the London Telecom Tower in 1962.

Felt (145)

Deep warm and charming brown colour, can be used on large surfaces to great effect

Purpleheart (188)

The classic 1970s purple. Used in all rooms, even specified by 1970s architects Pini and Zerbi for several entrance hall ceilings!

Spanish Brown (32)

A type of naturally-occurring dark red ochre pigment which was specified for external work

Chocolate Colour (124)

It is believed that Frederick Handel and Benjamin Franklin had their London front doors painted in this rich, almost edible shade

Thai Sapphire (116)

A saturated and hot blue-adds splendour and drama to a scheme

Purple Brown (8)

A moody lightfast colour used extensively outdoors and on window sashes

Invisible Green (56)

Made popular by the landscape gardener Humphry Repton who recommended it for fencing and railings so that they would blend better with the background vegetation

Basalt (221)

For a distinctive front door, look no further than this timeless blue-black.

Jack Black (119)

The soot from a burning oil is collected to produce this pigment - this colour is absolute black

Obsidian Green (216)

A classic off-black colour, Obsidian Green has since been a popular colour for front doors and exterior railings, but in the 1970s it provided a dramatic backdrop to natural wood furnishings and khaki.

Portland (1)

Kibble (2)

Drab (3)

Dutch Green (4)

Roman Bronze (5)

Ochre (6)

Parchment (7)

Charlbury (8)

Hilltop (9)

Dormouse (10)

Grape (11)

Deep Mauve (12)

Fawn (13)

Taupe (14)

Etruscan Red (15)

Dark Bay (16)

Mole Brown (17)

Peat (18)

Britannia Bronze (19)

Etruscan Red (20)

Vatican Red (21)

Burnt Orange (22)

Creamware (23)

Canvas (24)

Portland (25)

Pearl Grey (26)

Clocktower (27)

Fava (28)

Swedish Grey (29)

Kibble (30)

Drab (31)

Birch (32)

Steel (33)

Paperlining (34)

Porcelain (35)

Cucumber (36)

Granite (37)

Umber (38)

Fence Green (39)

Grey Green (40)

Ross Grey (41)

Greyfriars (42)

Wirework (43)

Pewter (44)

Slate Blue (45)

Pebble (46)

Deep Green Blue Grey (47)

Silver Lavender (48)

Lead Grey (49)

Ash Grey (50)

Cobble Grey (51)

Mullet (52)

Hilltop (53)

Wood Ash (54)

Mushroom (55)

Britannia Bronze (56)

Graphite Grey (57)

Canvas (58)

Candle (59)

Swedish Grey (60)

Porcelain (61)

Cucumber (62)

Granite (63)

Umber (64)

Berrisford Blue (65)

Fence Green (66)

Sea Green (67)

Grey Green (68)

Ross Grey (69)

English Pear (70)

Sage (71)

Light Olive (72)

Olive Green (73)

Juniper Green (74)

Dutch Green (75)

Deep Green Blue Grey (76)

Silver Lavender (77)

Peacock Blue (78)

Chalk (79)

Hilltop (80)

White Pepper (81)

Dormouse (82)

Grape (83)

Deep Mauve (84)

Josephine (85)

Old Rose (86)

Shell (87)

Mushroom (88)

Snow White (89)

Warm White (90)

Paper White (91)

Ivory (92)

Tatton Trellis (93)

English Plaster (94)

Creamware (95)

Fountain (96)

Shaded Satin (97)

Canvas (98)

White Pepper (99)

Palladian (100)

Portland (101)

Candle (102)

Ice (103)

Birch (104)

Paperlining (105)

Porcelain (106)

Lauren (107)

Plumeria (108)

Parchment (109)

Chalk (110)

Birch (111)

Steel (112)

Cucumber (113)

Lauren (114)

Berrisford Blue (115)

Fence Green (116)

Greyfriars (117)

Slate Blue (118)

Smoke Blue (119)

Pebble (120)

Delft (121)

Stow Blue (122)

Deep Green Blue Grey (123)

Silver Lavender (124)

Peacock Blue (125)

Plumeria (126)

Cavendish (127)

Dijon (128)

Bayswater (129)

Ochre (130)

Charlbury (131)

Natural

Mid Stain

Mid stain.

Pine Dark

Dark stain.

Limed Oak (OAK)

Limed Oak Finish

Natural

Natural solid European Oak with distressed finish and matt lacquer to seal.

Mid Stain

Mid stain.

Dark Stain

Dark Stain.

Made in Britain